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Towers

Practice matching numbers to build block towers. Finish all your towers first to win!

Ages: 3-5
Players: 2+
Time: 10-20 Minutes
Type: number games
Location: around the house
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Ages: 3-5
Players: 2+
Time: 10-20 Minutes
Type: number games
Location: around the house

Instructions

This game uses the deck you made in our Number Deck activity. (Or see Variations if you don't have a Number Deck.) You'll also need blocks, paper cups, or anything that can be stacked to build a tower. Remove the zeros from your Number Deck, leaving only 1-10, and separate out the numeral cards from the rest.

Each player picks 5 numeral cards and lays them out face up. Shuffle the rest of the cards and place them face down in a draw pile.

10 cards on the floor face up with a draw pile between them
Lay the numeral cards face up. Shuffle the remaining cards for a draw pile.

Take turns flipping over the top card of the draw pile. As you flip over a card, say the number out loud. The player with that number as one of their towers takes the card and uses it to add a level to their tower.

Drawing from the pile and placing on top of the cards
The first level has been added to 8.

As the numeral cards are covered up, it gets harder to match the cards.

Towers of cards gettig taller

The first player to complete all of their towers wins! (And maybe gets demolition rights?)

Don't forget: it's Beast Academy Playground, not Beast Academy Study Hall. Change the rules, be silly, make mistakes, and try again. The Variations and Learning Notes are here for you if you want to dive deeper, but not all of them apply to learners of every age. The most important thing is to have fun.

Variations d

Little Builders:

For the very youngest children, play collaboratively. Arrange all the numeral cards (you can include 0 here) in order from least to greatest. Then draw cards one at a time. Identify the number with your child, then add it to the matching tower.

More Players:

Got a whole construction crew ready to get to work? As long as you can split up the numeral cards evenly, this game works for more players. For 3 players, take out the 0 and 10 from the numerals. You can leave these in the middle and still build towers on them, if you like. (It'll save you the time finding and removing all the 0 and 10 cards throughout the whole deck.)

Even and Odd Numbers:

Use Towers to practice recognizing even and odd numbers. Let one player have all the even numerals, and the other player have all the odd numerals. (Don't miss the chance to say, "Hmmm, all of your towers sure are odd!") What makes a number even? All its dots can be paired up. Notice this with your child when looking at cards from the Dots suit. Odd numbers always have a leftover dot when the other dots are paired up.

Number Deck Alternatives:

Our Number Deck activity shows how to make, print out, or purchase a deck like the one used for this game. But, you could also use four suits of standard playing cards (remove the Aces and face cards), UNO cards, or other game cards. Your child will still get a chance to recognize and match numerals.

Classroom Tips d

Play this simple game to practice subitizing and matching numbers represented in different forms. Alternatively, students can "stack" cards by sticking them to a white board with magnets, or taping them to butcher paper on the wall.

Discussion Questions

  • Which suits make it easiest to recognize numbers quickly?
  • Are there numbers you can recognize in the Dots suit without counting?
  • Which numbers are easiest to recognize in the Ten Frames suit?
  • What number would you add to your card to make 10?
  • How can you tell whether a number is even or odd? (see Variations)

Alignment with Beast Academy Curriculum

  • Level 2, Chapter 9: Odds & Evens (see Variations)

See Variations and Learning Notes for more ideas on how to adapt this activity and incorporate it into your classroom.

Learning Notes d

Recognizing Numbers:

At first, children may need to count to recognize the number of the Dots, Tally Marks, and Ten Frames. That's fine. Count along with them if they need help. In time, they will be able to look at a card and recognize the number of dots instantly. The Dots suit has specific patterns to recognize. The Tally Marks and Ten Frames organize numbers into two groups of 5. This helps kids notice that 5, for example, is one filled-out row on a Ten Frame, and 10 is two filled-out rows. 4 is one less than a whole row whereas 6 is one more than a whole row. When a child is able to recognize a number very quickly, ask, "How did you know that so quickly? You didn't even have time to count!" and let them explain.

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Materials
  • Number Deck or other playing cards
  • blocks or something else stackable
Learning Goals
  • recognizing numbers
  • counting
Common Core Standards
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Ready to level up?

Keep problem solving with Beast Academy’s full math curriculum for students ages 7–13. Check out our captivating comic book series and immersive online platform.

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Keep your entire class engaged with a full book and online math curriculum, for students ages 7–13. 98% of teachers say they’re satisfied with Beast Academy.

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